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Chain Tensioner

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Chain tensioner - For fixies or conversion to single speed

Kettenspanner Fixie frames with horizontal dropout often require a chain tensioner to fix the rear wheel in a fixed position and to screw the axle securely and firmly to the frame. This type of chain tension is mechanically implemented very easily and keeps the chain permanently to the desired length. Thus, the axle of the rear wheel can not slip even in abrupt braking maneuvers or incursions. Another variant is the sprung chain tensioner when single-speed conversion to bicycle frame with vertical dropout. To convert a bike with gear shifting to a fixie or single-speed, the normal dropout does not allow for a horizontal shift of the rear wheel. The chain can only be held in tension by mounting a special chain tensioner. With a spring chain tensioner you succeed in a few simple steps to realize your single-speed bike project!

Fixed Gear or Singlespeed Bike

The difference between a fixie and the singlespeed is technically very simple, but in practice this difference is significant. A so-called singlespeed bike has, just like the fixie, only one gear and is very similar to a normal bike next to the missing gearshift. In a Fixie or Fixed Gear Bike this single gear is fixed. The rear hub thus has no freewheel as in conventional wheels. The single-speed drive is often used on BMX or dirt bikes. The fixed gear, however, is often found on train wheels or the fixies for the city. A major difference between these two drives is that you always have to ride the Fixed Gear bike. This can be very tiring in the long run, especially downhill, since of course you have to step in here as well. For this reason, some fixis do not have conventional brakes, as the riders bring the bike to a halt with "holding back". However, we advise against it in every respect, because your bike is thus officially no longer roadworthy.

Fixie frames with horizontal dropout often require a chain tensioner to fix the rear wheel in a fixed position and to screw the axle securely and firmly to the frame. This type of chain tension... read more »
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Chain tensioner - For fixies or conversion to single speed

Kettenspanner Fixie frames with horizontal dropout often require a chain tensioner to fix the rear wheel in a fixed position and to screw the axle securely and firmly to the frame. This type of chain tension is mechanically implemented very easily and keeps the chain permanently to the desired length. Thus, the axle of the rear wheel can not slip even in abrupt braking maneuvers or incursions. Another variant is the sprung chain tensioner when single-speed conversion to bicycle frame with vertical dropout. To convert a bike with gear shifting to a fixie or single-speed, the normal dropout does not allow for a horizontal shift of the rear wheel. The chain can only be held in tension by mounting a special chain tensioner. With a spring chain tensioner you succeed in a few simple steps to realize your single-speed bike project!

Fixed Gear or Singlespeed Bike

The difference between a fixie and the singlespeed is technically very simple, but in practice this difference is significant. A so-called singlespeed bike has, just like the fixie, only one gear and is very similar to a normal bike next to the missing gearshift. In a Fixie or Fixed Gear Bike this single gear is fixed. The rear hub thus has no freewheel as in conventional wheels. The single-speed drive is often used on BMX or dirt bikes. The fixed gear, however, is often found on train wheels or the fixies for the city. A major difference between these two drives is that you always have to ride the Fixed Gear bike. This can be very tiring in the long run, especially downhill, since of course you have to step in here as well. For this reason, some fixis do not have conventional brakes, as the riders bring the bike to a halt with "holding back". However, we advise against it in every respect, because your bike is thus officially no longer roadworthy.